Massage therapy is the scientific manipulation of the soft tissues of the body for the purpose of normalizing those tissues and consists of manual techniques that include applying fixed or movable pressure, holding, and/or causing movement of or to the body.

Generally, massage is known to affect the circulation of blood and the flow of blood and lymph, reduce muscular tension or flaccidity, affect the nervous system through stimulation or sedation, and enhance tissue healing. These effects provide a number of benefits but not limited to:

  • reduction of muscle tension and stiffness
  • relief of muscle spasms
  • greater flexibility and range of motion
  • increase of the ease and efficiency of movement
  • relief of stress and aide of relaxation
  • promotion of deeper and easier breathing
  • improvement of the circulation of blood and movement of lymph
  • relief of tension-related conditions, such as headaches and eyestrain
  • promotion of faster healing of soft tissue injuries, such as pulled muscles and sprained ligaments, and reduction in pain and swelling related to such injuries
  • reduction in the formation of excessive scar tissue following soft tissue injuries
  • enhancement in the health and nourishment of skin
  • improvement in posture through changing tension patterns that affect posture
  • reduction in stress and an excellent stress management tool
  • creation of a feeling of well-being
  • reduction in levels of anxiety
  • increase in awareness of the mind-body connection
  • promotion of a relaxed state of mental awareness

At Bend Spinal Care our goal is to make you feel your best in the shortest amount of time. Our therapists are trained in many different techniques from your basic swedish (relaxing, “feel-good” massage) to therapeutic (injury specific) to pregnancy massage. Whatever type of massage you are seeking, Bend Spinal Care is sure to provide it.

References to massage are found in Chinese medical texts more than 4,000 years old. Massage has been advocated in Western health care practices at least since the time of Hippocrates, the “Father of Medicine.” In the fourth century B.C.”The physician must be acquainted with many things and assuredly with rubbing” (the ancient Greek term for massage was rubbing).
-Hippocrates